History  Players  Teams  Obituaries  Site search  Contact Us

Sponsor a page on Historic Baseball! Click here for details

Dee Fondy

Dee Virgil Fondy
Born: Oct. 31, 1924 in Slaton, Texas
Died: Aug. 19, 1999 in Redlands, Calif.
Debut: 1951 | Pos: 1B
H: 6'3" | W: 196 | B: L | T: L
 
YR G AB R H HR RBI SB BA
8 967 3502 437 1000 69 373 84 .286

>> Visit the Dee Fondy biography on Baseball Almanac for complete statistics.


Dee Fondy, who played first base for the Cubs, Pirates and Reds, died on Aug. 19, 1999 in Redlands, Calif., following a battle with cancer. He was 74.

He played in 967 games in the major leagues over an eight-year career. His totals include 1,000 hits, 69 home runs and 373 RBI.

According to his obituary, Fondy grounded out as the last out in Pittsburgh's 2-0 loss to the Dodgers on Sept. 24, 1957. It was the last out recorded at Ebbets Field since the Dodgers moved to California for the next season.

"Dee Fondy was one of my favorite people," said baseball commissioner Bud Selig, as reported in wire reports. "He had a great sense of humor. He and I used to kid each other a lot."

Fondy entered spring training with the Dodgers in 1949 in a three-way battle for first base with Gil Hodges and Chuck Connors. Hodges won the job and Connors would eventually become the star of the TV show, "The Rifleman."

In October 1950, Brooklyn traded Fondy, along with Connors, to the Chicago Cubs for Hank Edwards. Fondy's first major league hit came on April 17, 1951 when he hit a triple with the bases loaded off the Cardinals' Ken Raffensberger.

In May 1957, the Cubs traded Fondy, along with Gene Barker, to the Pirates for Dale Long and Lee Walls. In December of that year, the Pirates traded him to Cincinnati for Ted Kluszweski.

Following his career as a player, Fondy worked as a scout and in the front office for the New York Mets and Milwaukee Brewers. One of his signings was Paul Molitor who was elected to baseball's hall of fame in 2004.

He served in the Army during World War II and received the Purple Heart.

Source: Associated Press